Trinidad: High­ly-ac­claimed cuatroist Robert Munro is dead

By Wesley Gibbing

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Munro proudly displays a poster of his 2015 biopic, The Cuatro Man

(TRINIDAD GUARDIAN) — High­ly-ac­claimed cu­a­troist, Robert Munro, died at the Port-of-Spain Gen­er­al Hos­pi­tal ear­ly Thursday fol­low­ing a pe­ri­od of ill­ness.

Munro, 73, was well known for his skills on an in­stru­ment he taught him­self to play as a teenag­er. In re­cent years, he be­came less ac­tive as a re­sult of grad­ual hear­ing loss and arthri­tis which af­fect­ed his fin­gers.

Over a long ca­reer, he played along­side per­form­ers such as Lord Kitch­en­er and Re­la­tor, a num­ber of parang bands, and a gen­er­a­tion of cu­a­troists he men­tored, in­clud­ing ac­com­plished per­former, Do­minic Thomp­son.

Munro was a reg­u­lar at of­fi­cial func­tions up to the 1990s and, de­spite a lack of for­mal ex­po­sure to mu­sic, mas­tered a vast reper­toire that in­clud­ed clas­si­cal, jazz, ca­lyp­so and parang mu­sic.

Thomp­son told Guardian Me­dia his men­tor con­tin­ued to “play in pain” over re­cent years as a re­sult of his ill­ness­es.

“But this is a part of life,” he said. “I get the im­pres­sion that he was tired of every­thing, es­pe­cial­ly since he could not play as he liked.”

Munro of­ten lament­ed a lack of na­tion­al recog­ni­tion. His life as a mu­si­cian is how­ev­er record­ed in Mikhail Gib­bings’ biopic, The Cu­a­tro Man, which played at the 2015 T&T Film Fes­ti­val and at the 2016 St Lu­cia Arts Fes­ti­val.

Fu­ner­al arrange­ments have yet not been an­nounced by his fam­i­ly.

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