Stakeholders to discuss potential decline in Fer-de-Lance population

31
Stakeholders to discuss potential decline in Fer-de-Lance population

Concerns have been expressed by a community group regarding encounters with the Bothrops caribbaeus or Fer-de-Lance, where it is believed that there is a potential decline in the species’ population.

On further observations by the Forestry Department, the Saint Lucia National Trust (SLNT) has agreed to embark on a process to ensure that this specie is adequately researched and managed.

Accordingly, this initiative commenced with the undertaking of preliminary research in the form a survey in targeted communities by the Forestry Department and the conducting of several expert interviews which were done by the SLNT and the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust.

The results from these exercises will feed into the Management Plan that is being developed for the conservation of the Fer-de-Lance.

Consequently, in an effort to obtain further information for the preparation of the Management Plan, to validate some of the information that has already been gathered and to begin sensitizing key stakeholders, the SLNT will be hosting a stakeholder’s consultation for 15th and 16th October 2014 from 9:00 a.m. at the Cardinal Kelvin Felix Archdiocesan Pastoral Centre, Marisule, Gros Islet.

The consultation is made possible with support of funding from the GEF Small Grants Programme and the assistance of the Forestry Department, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and Fauna and Flora International.

The aim of the consultation is to share the SLNT’s conservation works with the public and effect the necessary changes to ensure the survival of the island’s natural heritage.

The Fer-de-lance snake is considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world. This type is however only found in St Lucia. Studies have shown that the poisonous snake is threatened with extinction in St. Lucia and is now limited to two fragmented areas on the island.

(0)(0)

No posts to display

31 COMMENTS

  1. tim rob you are not a st lucian by birth we are farmers and we know the dangers the fer de lance poise to st lucian so mister take the back seat we had enough of that brain wash education to make us fools please let st lucian deal with this matter on their own save your species in your home land no tim no rob never born in st lucia learn a little about our history and get familiar to the names

    (1)(0)

  2. Has anyone considered how important to maintain this specie is?....especially in curtailing or even making a small impact on st.Lucia's rodent infestation. In a world where diseases are rampant and we don't even know what potential "horrors" are held in check by these wild animals (notwithstanding that that they're venemous). We need to think broader .....

    (0)(0)

  3. so freaking stupid save what why do we need these snakes in st lucia why dont the goverment spend money on roads and bridges so i get to enjoy st lucia when on vacation kenny i dont go in the bushes any more the snakes can have their way but my lucian people dont be fooled lets destroy them there is no punishment for killing the fer de lance but your family have to find money to have a proper burial for you when attack by the fer de lance bull shit foresty go plant some herb and educate the nation about the herb the healing of our nation

    (0)(0)

  4. I am all for conservation ... But it that Snake is dying of " natural causes " then I say so be it .. Nature has always been changing , with new spices of animal plants etc . So I say spent y'all research money else where! Imagine if dinosaur had survive and still
    Be around or thesaber tooth tiger .smh

    (0)(0)

  5. The ferdelance is poisonous snake?...rite. It can kill humans...rite? Therefore the fewer, the less likely ons may bite a human..rite? So no big ting if their population dwingle...praise to jah...BTW of what use are they to looshans?

    (0)(0)

  6. Once again I am dumbfounded! Wonder who are the person(s) behind such ideas. Really, don't we have more important matters to attend to? Things seem to upside down in Slu.

    (0)(0)

  7. Had to retype my comment 20 times cause my position on this carry's to much emotion. People this is just BS... what is wrong with our so called heritage ppl and them conservationist? They now want to prevent one of the world's most 10 poisonous snakes which was practically imported and claim say ut is indigenous to St. Lucia. What a lie... topping it off there is no anti venom anf it can nit be stored for to long.. why encourage it then... they should jail them ppl that thinking of that dump shit

    (0)(0)

  8. and all you hypocrite lucians talking shit about conservation, what happened to frigate? it was supposedly so important and what happened they destroyed it to create a dam eye sore, up to now that hotel eh finish will never finish. what about all the animal species that were displaced, the lead man for the national trust became one of the lead men for the company building the eye sore. funny how money changes everything so tell dem forestry people if they have no work to do go plant freaking trees in the forest to stop erosion and stop the bull shit about snake conservation.

    (0)(0)

    • "...go plant freaking trees in the forest to stop erosion and stop the bull shit about snake conservation." lol.
      That being said, if there is any credit to what they are looking into then this short video might share light on it from a similar standpoint. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa5OBhXz-Q
      My outstanding question though is whether St.Lucia has anti venom unit/department at the general hospital or at least have some vials of anti venom in case someone is bitten?

      (1)(0)

  9. how many people have died from those snakes? is there any program or study in place to get an anti venom to this deadly snake? if the answer is no all those f****ng snakes need to be eliminated immediately with this conservation nonsense. will we just accept people dying every time they come into contact with that snake, mi say kill dem ras.

    (1)(1)

  10. at the same time bring some ebola,bird flu,chicken pox,rattlers,lions,crocodiles lucians not dying fast enough

    (0)(0)

  11. Understand that nature is about balance. True the snake was brought here. But after over 100 years it is now in harmony with its environment.

    One example to consider: As bad as the rat population is -- if either snake were to go; the rat population would explode.

    I am convinced there is a link between the loss of the Jack Spaniard and the rise in the flying termites.

    True there are other biting issues out there. But let us not tug at a thread and undo the whole shirt.

    (0)(0)

  12. I am struggling with what I have just read. It is not because of the language, it's has everything to do with it's content and concept. During my earlier years of school in St. Lucia, I learned that the Fer-de-Lance were imported and released into the woods by plantation owners to dissuade slaves from fleeing. Even the books I recently bought from home state the same thing. Very obviously, it is not indigenous to home.

    What are the benefits of that snake on the island? It escapes me. The boa is fine. The poisonous fer-de-lance has killed at least two locals in the past year. Are the families compensated for their losses? Compounding the problem, there are frequent instances when there is no antidote available because of improper funding. Any decision to preserve those poisonous snakes, should include a responsibility to compensate victims and have antidotes readily available. Thank you.

    (0)(0)

  13. Hey this the world most dangerous snake and we talking about survival of the island heritage.My God all of them should be destroyed.How many of us have to died.What is the benefit of these snakes to St.Lucia? We can do without it.

    (0)(0)

  14. If conserving those snales are so important. Then they should also work with the ministry of health to invest in anti venom.

    (0)(0)

  15. This is ridiculous! People have died because of the lack or absence of ant-venom in St. Lucia. So will i be charged if i kill it before it kills me? Why are we so focused on this? In my opinion these snaked should be terminated!

    (0)(0)

  16. are snakes more important than human beings?
    no wonder we have so much crime on this small island. why worry about snake and not worry about homicides? do snakes attend funerals? social gatherings?

    (0)(0)

  17. You all dont have better thing to worry about ? Go and check on the senior citizen who have contribute to this country an now living in poverty. Go check on the children whose parents are poor and cannot take care of their children.go start raising funs to help build for the unfortunate.and leave the wild animals alone..they can live without your help,but a little help from you can go a long way for the disable and the unprivileged persons...nonsense..you tell me about snakes..choopppzzzz

    (0)(0)

    • The Crow says that you are an idiot! How are these (the things you have highlighted) the duty of the SLNT and the Forestry department? And by the way, these snakes have their role in the environment too.

      (0)(0)

  18. Do you want to kill more St Lucian....Drop them in England to prick the descendants of those who brought them here in the first place.

    (0)(0)

Comments are closed.