Some not convinced chikungunya is spread by mosquitoes, official says it is

Some not convinced chikungunya is spread by mosquitoes, official says it is
The aedes aegypti mosquito.
The aedes aegypti mosquito is known to transmit chikungunya.

Suggestions that the vector-borne disease chikungunya may not be transmitted by mosquitoes have been deemed untrue by the Ministry of Health.

Environmental Health Officer Charletta Charles told media that many individuals have been questioning how the disease is spread and even suggesting that it may not be due to the aedes aegypti mosquito because of the spike in cases and severity of symptoms.

Charles said however, that scientific testing has proven that the disease is indeed caused by the vector.

“We’ve been hearing that a lot but we need to be persistent. The research has been done. The studies have been done both in St. Lucia and out of St. Lucia and it’s a fact we get this disease from a mosquito. I think it’s because the cases have been climbing so quickly that people cannot believe [and are asking] ‘a mosquito did that?’ They are surprised. So they want to attribute that to something else, but the fact is it’s a mosquito and we’re just trying to be persistent,” she stated.

Health officials in Dominica had recently said that they are faced with a similar battle in the fight against chikungunya due to some of the population being unwilling to accept that the disease is transmitted by mosquitoes.

These individuals have been unwilling to take certain steps to rid the environment of potential mosquito-breeding grounds. Over 2,000 people have been infected with the disease in Dominica.

St. Lucia’s first chikungunya case was confirmed in April.

People suffering with the illness will mainly feel chronic pain in the joints, and although it will not require being admitted to a hospital, there will be prolonged pain or swelling in the joints.

Symptoms of chikungunya appear between four to seven days after the bite of an infected mosquito. The majority of clinical signs and symptoms last three to 10 days, but joint pain may persist longer. Severe cases requiring hospitalisation are rare.

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17 COMMENTS

  1. Hello, my mom recently traveled to the D.R and got chikungunya.
    She came back unaware of it and the second day she was here she had the symptoms. My brother sister and my cousin all got the chikungunya!!! Also my aunt just got it.. its airborne..and i think it also is spread by a mosquito.. they just dont want to admit or scare people... IT IS AIRBORNE. plus my mom nor anyone here had a mosquito bite.
    we live in NYC btw! be safe!!! and use plenty of hand sanitizer

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  2. Hi Lucians,   although I love St Lucia, glad I'm not there right now with all those mosquitoes.

    This article on Chikugunya was posted by National Geographic on 1 July  '14:

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140701-chikungunya-caribbean-mosquitoes-world-health/

    Also check out this article, Point  7 is an 'eye opener' :

    http://www.asienreisender.de/chikungunya.html

    ... Who knows what really goes on in our world...

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  3. so true why havent ministry of health smoked the areas. i believe is because is not mosquitoes that spread it. and they're saying this mosquitoes still gives dengue so does these mosquito chooses which to give a
    person

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  4. Chikungunya in India
    Most number of Chikungunya infections(which peaked in 2006) are reported from India. Majority of infections are reported from southern states (Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu). The total infections reported is over 1.3 million and in some areas about 50% of the population is affected by this disease. Also a large number of infections are unreported or are misdiagnosed.

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  5. The disease was first was first detected in 1952 in Africa following an outbreak on the Makonde Plateau. This is a border area between Mozambique and Tanzania. The virus was isolated from the serum of a febrile patient from this area. The name chikungunya is derived from the Makonde word meaning "that which bends up" in reference to the stooped posture developed as a result of the arthritic symptoms of the disease. In Swahili this means "the illness of the bended walker”. Makonde is the language spoken by the Makonde, an ethnic group in southeast Tanzania and northern Mozambique.

    According to the initial 1955 report about the epidemiology of the disease, the term 'chikungunya' is derived from the Makonde root verb kungunyala, meaning to dry up or become contorted. The Makonde term was more specifically referred to as "that which bends up". Subsequent authors apparently overlooked the references to the Makonde language and assumed that the term derived from Swahili, the lingua franca of the region. The erroneous attribution of the term as a Swahili word has been repeated in numerous print sources. Many other erroneous spellings and forms of the term are in common use including "Chicken guinea", "Chicken gunaya," and "Chickengunya".

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) likely originated in Central/East Africa, where the virus has been found to circulate in a sylvatic cycle between forest-dwelling mosquitoes and nonhuman primates. In these areas, sporadic human cases occur, but large human outbreaks were not common. However, in urban centers of Africa as well as throughout Asia, the virus can circulate between mosquitoes and naive human hosts in a cycle similar to that of dengue viruses.

    Since its discovery in Africa, in 1952, chikungunya virus outbreaks have occurred occasionally, but recent outbreaks have spread the disease to other parts of the world. Numerous chikungunya re-emergences have been documented in Africa, Asia (India), and Europe, with irregular intervals of 2–20 years between outbreaks. Currently, chikungunya fever has been identified in nearly 40 countries. In 2008, chikungunya was listed as a US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) category C priority pathogen.

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  6. My mom and sister allegedly got it.
    There are so many mosquitoes. No matter how much we spray the house, they're there. Morning, noon and night. They're not dying. (I've yet to see any fogging done in my area btw.) Also, why hasn't my brother who is always home with my sister and mom gotten it?
    I don't believe in luck nor can I say it's a conspiracy. Something is just not adding up.

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  7. Its all a bunch of bull.scare tactics employed by the government to control the sheeple.wake up people ur so blind.its airborne for crying out loud.

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  8. It is amazing how this chikungunya swepy through the is islands. How did it spread so quickly? Because it would seem that all aedes egyptyi and aedes albino mosquitos travelled in a pack to the caribbean and dispersed to bring about this sickness all at once...

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  9. Its a bit strange to me too. Carried by the same mosquito that carries dengue. Same environment. This thing is very new and yet it has already passed dengue in transmission. The numbers don't add up.

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    • We in the Caribbean are resistant to dengue fever. So even if a mosquito with dengue bites you, you may not get it. However since chikungunya is new to the region we have no resistance to it. Hence the reason that it has surpassed dengue in transmission.

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  10. I believed it's spread by sex,it's the new aids...wear a condom and you'll be safe from it.

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    • SAY WAT??? N MY 3 YR OLD GOT IT?? SO U TELLING ME SHE HAVIN SEX?? REALLY LMAO . LOL LOL SMH

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  11. i am a skeptic as well because this is spreading like wild fire and the authorities aren't even using the fog vans to assist even though i myself do the necessary things but alittle help wouldn't kill

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