Sea egg, wild crayfish sales not permitted for Jounen Kwéyòl 2014

By GIS

GIS – The Department of Fisheries has issued a closed season due to low population numbers.

The Fisheries Department has issued a warning for the harvesting of exotic seafood for the 2014 Jounen Kwéyòl season.

In accordance with the Fish­eries Act and the Fisheries Regulations Cap 7.15 of the revised laws of St. Lucia 2008, the Department of Fisheries reminds vendors and persons who will be participating in Jounèn Kwèyòl 2014 activities that the sea egg and crayfish seasons are closed.

Recent assessments of sea egg (sea urchin) populations in Saint Lucia revealed that the numbers of sea eggs are too low to allow for a harvest, resulting in the Sea Egg Fishery re­maining closed for the 2014 season.

In addition, an extended close season or moratorium remains in effect on the harvest and sale of freshwater shrimp, prawns or crayfish. The crayfish resource contin­ues to be threatened by the ille­gal use of poisonous substances as a common means of harvest­ing.

“It is therefore illegal [for a person] to remove from the rivers of Saint Lucia, expose for sale, sell, purchase, or at any time have in his possession fresh wa­ter shrimp or crayfish, [and] to disturb, damage, harvest, have in his possession, pur­chase or sell sea eggs during the close season,” the Fisheries Department stated.

Persons are encouraged, instead, to purchase farmed prawns from aquacul­ture farmers. Farmed prawns when alive can be generally distinguished by their large blue pincers (gan­di) which are not present in the wild-caught prawns.

Vendors are also asked to observe the regula­tions during the open Lobster Fishery.

When purchasing and selling lobsters during the open fishery period, each lobster is required to have a carapace length of 9.5 c.m. or more, and must not be carry­ing eggs or show evidence of having eggs re­moved. The lobster should not have a soft shell due to molting; nor should it be speared or hooked.

The Department of Fisheries urges all persons to adhere to the regula­tions and not purchase river-caught crayfish, sea eggs or lobsters that are undersized or buried, to ensure that there are lob­sters, sea eggs and crayfish for generations to come, and that Saint Lucia’s fisheries resource re­mains healthy.

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25 comments

  1. They just recently (this weekend) poisoned the river in La Ressource. So be careful people.

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  3. @e.w if you have it, cook it now and send me some. I feel so sad, was looking forward to eating some crayfish soon but of course I understand why these measures ought to be taken. Never had the sea egg though.

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  5. SHOULD I THROW AWAY ALL THE CRAYFISH I CATCH ALREADY? YOU ALL JUST WANT TO HELP THE TAIWANESE SELL PRAWNS...chooooopsss

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  7. The Department of fisheries can suck my balls for all I care. Where they make that assessment? Since when people using poison to catch crayfish? It's a skill and art in St. Lucia part of my heritage.
    My predecessors used to go in the river and push their hand under a stone to feel around and get bitten and I will do the same.
    These people just sit in their damn office have no affiliations with the practices and make foolish decisions. I going and catch crayfish this weekend come and find me if you ll know where to find "grande 'age".

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    • Yes they do use poison to catch crayfish. I have been witness to it and it even happened last weekend in La Ressource where dead crayfish and other creatures were dead, floating on the water. So before you bash people for things you are not familiar with, please do research instead of sounding like a moron. Not because your predecessors practised the art of catching crayfish by putting their hand under the stone, or looking in bamboo or in coconuts husks in the water, does not mean that this is the widespread practise now. People no longer have time for this and instead resort to poisoning the rivers.

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  9. That should not b. What they have to do is to increase the fine for crayfish and a prison sentence added for poisoning the river. Besides they can use members of the public to report it. They can have persons selling to get a special permit plus say who they bying from plus how much. Persons fishing should fish on the permit given to those persons. And get a temporary fishing license

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  11. ok a question for anyone out there whaen was this crayfish season closed? reason i as is what if i had crayfish that i had caught previously to the closing of the season and it was in my fridge and i say i goin to sell it at creole day will i still be fined

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    • yes. You cannot have it in your possession.

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      • i dont think you understood my question what am sayin is if i had already colleted crayfish previously before they closed the season and it is in my fridge how can the police know if i did catch it in on season cause they said dont cath them in off season cause if i catched them in on season and police bust my house they would say i have it in my possession but i did infact catch them during the on season. so whats the case here now

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        • I don't think you understood the answer. you cannot have it in your possession once the season is closed. It is irrelevant whether you caught it in season, you CANNOT HAVE IT.

          It's exactly the same for lobsters.

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    • I do not think that should be a problem e.w.
      Because you obtained the crayfish during open season.
      Now sure how authorities will look at that.

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    • How can you prove you obtained the crayfish before the season was closed.

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  13. it was long over due!!!

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  15. The preservation of crawfish and sea-eggs are crucial for future generations and sustenance of supplies. The method of harvesting by poisoning and dynamiting should be banned completely. The preservation of the environment should be a mandatory subject beginning at an early age in schools. Administration and enforcement are crucial for sustainability.

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    • you need to get your facts right most crayfish are caught in traps and by hand. And there are places where no one hunts for sea eggs with thriving populations that these experts will not even step a foot.

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      • You said it right ( MOST). Those which are caught otherwise destroys a vast amount of life. It is evident when they float down river.

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  17. Now it needs to be enforced.

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  19. SEA EGG SEASON HAVE BEEN CLOSED FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS NOW AND YET STILL YOU SEE PEOPLE SELLING SEA EGGS ALL OVER THE PLACE IN VIEUX FORT. I GUESS THE MINISTRY OFFICIALS ARE NOT DOING THEIR JOBS. THEY NEED TO GET OUT THERE AND CATCH THESE CULPRITS OR ELSE PEOPLE LIKE ME WILL NEVER BE ABLE TO EAT A SEA EGG AGAIN CAUSE I REFUSE TO BUY IT ONCE THE SEASON IS CLOSED!!!

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  21. It was way past time

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  23. Good work Fisheries Department, I want to see big fines given out to any sinners.

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  26. That's fantastic news. Persons usually place toxic substances in the rivers around this time of year to catch crayfish reeking havoc on river life.

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