Ministry of Health, Wellness, Human Services and Gender Relations to host “Clothes Line Project” on Nov. 28

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Ministry of Health, Wellness, Human Services and Gender Relations to host “Clothes Line Project” on Nov. 28

8f1bc0fa-a3c3-4836-a376-ef4661d126cfPRESS RELEASE – The Division of Gender Relations of the Ministry of Health, Wellness, Human Services and Gender Relations will be hosting the “Clothes Line Project” at the Vieux Fort Independence Square on November 28th 2015 from 11:00 a.m.

The Clothesline Project is a visual display that bears witness to the violence against women and children. The Clothesline Project comprises T-shirts designed by survivors of abuse and those who have lost loved ones to it. The shirts are hung on a clothesline display to:

  • Honor survivors and memorialize victims
  • Help with the healing process for survivors and people who have lost a loved one to violence
  • Educate, document, and raise society’s awareness about the crimes of violence against women and children

The Clothesline Project was first introduced to Saint Lucia in 2011 by TOCO (They Often Cry Outreach) a U.S. based not-for-profit organization founded by St Lucian recording artiste and UNICEF Champion for Children in Saint Lucia Taj Weekes. In previous years the event was hosted in collaboration with the St Lucia Crisis Centre, Options Designs and media partner HTS/Radio100 Helen FM.

What the Shirts Represent

The Shirts on the ‘Clothesline’ represent a wide spectrum of abuse. Although each shirt is unique, a common color coding is generally used to represent the different dimensions of violence against women and children:

  • WHITE for women and children who have died as a result of domestic violence
  • YELLOW or BEIGE for women and children who have been battered or assaulted
  • RED, PINK or ORANGE for women and children who have been raped or sexually assaulted
  • BLUE or GREEN for women and children survivors of incest
  • PURPLE or LAVENDER for women and children attacked because of their sexual orientation/identification

The History of the Project

The Clothesline Project originated with 31 shirts in Hyannis, MA, in 1990 through the Cape Cod Women’s Agenda. A small group of women – many of whom had experienced violence in their own lives – designed the visual monument to help transform staggering statistics about violence against women and children into a powerful educational and healing tool. They decided to use a clothesline after discussing how many women in close-knit neighborhoods have traditionally exchanged information over backyard fences while hanging laundry out to dry.

The Clothesline Project breaks the silence about violence against women and children by giving a voice to survivors, victims and advocates. Since 1990, hundreds of Clothesline Projects have emerged worldwide, resulting in tens of thousands of shirt designs bearing witness to violence against women.

PERSONS ATTENDING THE EVENT SHOULD BRING ALONG A PLAIN TSHIRT ON WHICH THEY CAN CREATE A PERSONAL MESSAGE AGAINST ALL FORMS OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

The Clothesline Project is an activity for the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence observed annually from November 25 International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women to December 10 World Human Rights Day

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