Mentoring recommended to tackle gang problem

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Mentoring recommended to tackle gang problem
Felicia Browne.
Browne

PRESS RELEASE – The Caribbean Mentorship Institute (CMI) is alarmed by the number of young persons who have been associated with gang-related activities within the Caribbean region.

The Institute, which focuses on the mentoring of young people, believes that mentoring provides a good environment for the youth to develop their personal and professional skills. Mentoring has been known to increase the levels of high school graduation and youth involvement within their communities.

The President of the CMI, Ms. Felicia Browne, adds that “many young persons are not receiving the type of guidance that is needed for them to flourish within their communities. We have seen too many examples of young men and women who have dropped out of school to engage in criminal activities. This growing trend should be of grave concern to everyone. Our youth are not finding their way, and are often losing their lives due to errors of judgement. They need guidance and mentors to re-shape their thinking and understanding.”

The Caribbean Mentorship Institute which has been in operating for nearly three years has made several types of intervention in countries across the Caribbean region. However, the President is adamant that if community members and policy makers turn a blind eye to the plight of young persons, then we can rest assured that gang activities and criminality amongst disadvantaged youths will only escalate to create further harm within our communities and countries.

Ms. Browne adds that “we have continued to observe the escalation of violence in schools, and in public spaces. We have seen videos of violent fights, brawls and sexual misconduct of young persons on the social media, yet we are ignoring them because they are not happening in our communities or to our children. We are hearing that young men and women are joining or creating gangs because they are left with little choice but to look after their own wellbeing and safety. This is the reality of today’s youth. This is the reason why we cannot assume that they lack understanding or intellect to channel their lives in more positive and holistic ways. Their young lives are at risk, while we refuse to engage with them.”

The CMI President has urged community members and civil organisations to contact the Institute if they require any form of intervention or assistance to address problems among our youth. The Institute, which is based in Barbados, has partnering organisations throughout the Caribbean and the world.

 

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11 COMMENTS

  1. @ lushie koodos to you keep it up encourage other mothers to do the same encourage them to write to your district rep start a petition demanding programs of anti gang related education write them letters every day form mothers against gangs group fight for yall youths not the bigger men transforming them for yall if yall DON'T start doing something right Now take action women of ST LUCIA YOU ALL ARE STRONG: IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO RAISE A CHILD:(African Proverb)

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  2. @ me. if mankind was perfect you wud not be here anyways there aint no such thing as perfect it matters not what age women hv children, the fact that family values and morals are decaying in this world not only slu is causing alot of issues if you read and get abreast with world news you may learn a thing or two DON'T be quick to condemn the yutes it's not all of them doing shit just a hand full and before it gets worst social workers mentors, teachers, parents, priests, ministers, The PM ,police need to work together to organize a campaign that enable those vulnerable to get help,advise, and much more resources to curb the issues they are facing.

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  3. we just paying the price of sixteenyr olds making children an leaving them with dey parents no family structure

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  4. I'm a mother of a son who has his friends that are always together which you might call a gang. They're not a violent gang as yet but u may never know. They would sometimes get into problems with other boys over girls that they meet online. These boys usually have their gangs and this is how it starts,then later it might be drugs. For this reason I'm trying my best to help him get a job that will occupy him instead of this online thing but its hard to get a job. NSDC was a big help but nowadays its only mechanic trade that u can get and that takes time fitting them there.

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  5. We need a real boot camp to wipe those gang members back in shape. Some hard core reality in the islands of the Caribbean.

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  6. The family structure has come under serious challenges. Where as in the past having a child out of wedlock would have been frowned upon it is now accepted and that child has equal rights as one who was born within wedlock. We have the barrel babies, the minivan babies,the taxi babies and drug babies all these come under single parent who most times find themselves working long hours at the hotels leaving their children without adequate supervision and support. These children become at risk and that is where they are influence negatively. They form gangs to feel as part of a family and would do the dictate of the gang leader. The gang leaders in most cases are exconvict who have spent time within the prison system whether here or the U.S are well trained and will pass on their knowledge to the younger ones. Robbery, shooting, assassination and murder are what they are asked to do for their initiation into the gang. When homeless men are shot dead check the gangs identify the leaders some of them have strong links in the prison and are able to influence our correctional officers and police.

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  7. Yes, parents need to be taught also - but this is a generational problem. If parents lacked mentorship of their own growing up, how would they know to be effective mentors of their own children? It takes a village to raise a child. We are all responsible for being good examples.

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  8. Miss Browne,The Caribbean Mentorship Institute lacks the resources to adequately address the root causes of gang activities. A Caribbean national after spending extended time the US,UK OR Canada prisons, The Caribbean Mentorship Institute can successfully rehabilitate these individuals? We need a properly trained gang task force, to identify and dismantle gang activities before it gets out of hand

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  9. This 'sounds' good but why not tackle the PARENTS! People have children and are not held accountable in any way. Wake up people!

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