Craft and dry goods vendors ‘feeling the heat’

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Craft and dry goods vendors ‘feeling the heat’
A vendors stall lined up with craft and dry goods. Photo credit: 2013worldcruise-jimandginny.com.

 

A vendors stall lined up with craft and dry goods. Photo credit: 2013worldcruise-jimandginny.com.

Given the current economic situation on island and the high dependence on tourism, President of the Central Craft and Dry Goods Vendors Association (CCDGVA) Peter Isaac has proposed that government considers developing packages with Caribbean states to attract more tourists here.

Isaac told St. Lucia News Online (SNO) in a recent interview that he believes more measures need to be implemented to attract tourists from Caribbean and French territories that have not yet been targeted.

“… they sometimes do really good business. Sometimes the [benefit] is much better than the expectation from those from Europe,” he said.

Isaac said locally hundreds of people depend solely on tourism. The island is currently in the off-peak tourism season. During that time, a cruise ship may dock at Castries port once a week or every other week.

Peter Isaac.

“Really and truly in light of the economic situation, when the cruise season is closed it puts a strain on the industry,” the tourism stakeholder added.

Isaac explained that vendors depend mainly on the cruise tourism sector for sales, and from what he has seen some vendors open shops with the hope that tourists staying at hotels would patronise them.

He lamented that there is no other industry to piggyback on. 

The vendors who would fall under the dry goods category are those who vend clothing and souvenirs. 

The Carnival season is another period, which vendors bank on to generate an income, Isaac noted.

The CCSGVA president suggested that government look at creating tourism packages with cruise lines and airlines to promote the destination in other Caribbean territories, where tourism may not be the main income earner.

He believes that the possibility of such a venture could prove successful once the markets are properly studied.

The World Travel & Tourism Council Report of 2013 indicates that the total contribution of travel and tourism to St. Lucia’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was 39.0 percent. In 2012, it was reported that travel and tourism directly supported by 13,500 jobs.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. RAS IPA BETTER DAYS YOU WERE SINGING.WHAT YOU CRYING FOR ???KENNY AND TONY DO NOT WANT TO SEE YOU.JUST NOW THEIR PUTING YOU BACK IN CUSTODY SUITES."BETTER DAYS ARE HERE" YOU WILL LEARN.

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  2. Well what you are saying give credit to those who destroyed the Banana and by extension Agricultrual Industry. Take a look at those who sell, make money and promote tourism as the primiere industry of the country. Most people are afraid to say from whose brain it came from. As we now see Tourism is mainly seasonal in this part of the world and as islands we can offer natural attraction at most but limited because of sustainablity and the sensitivity of our environment.
    Make no mistake that the country is slowly being sold under us the citizens. For the capital to gain it is only in the hands of a few. What we have control over we do nothing about. Recently the main supermarket chain was requested by the Government of Trinidad to prepay its farmers for its up coming crop of agricultural produce. The figure stood at almost $300,000. This request was honored despite the fact that the supermarket already owes a figure close to this amount to the farmers of St. Lucia. DO WHATS RIGHT

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