House collapses!

61
House collapses!


A three-bedroom house collapsed in Marigot in the wee hours of this morning.

No one was at home at the time.  The family reportedly moved out yesterday after discovering multiple cracks in the house’s structure.

A neighbour told St. Lucia News Online that she heard a crackling sound then a loud “boom” at about 12:45 a.m. today, August 6.

A source close to the family told SNO that the house was built about two years ago and comprised three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen, dining area, and three balconies.

Five persons lived in the house, but one – a national footballer – is currently overseas.

The source blamed the collapse on faulty construction, saying that a civil lawsuit may be in progress.

Neighbours are thankful that no one was at home at the time of the collapse because as one put person pointed out, “no one could survive this”.

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61 COMMENTS

  1. Believe me those suckers of so called contractors need to rot in jail. Same thing happen to my bro house some years ago in chase garden. Four bedroom home. Just as he left the house with his family heafing to work,he turn back to see the house collapse. This is bull and the thief the materials he supplied cause the did not put enouse steel,skipping areas

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  2. It is really frustrating when i see or hear people blaming the authorities ( Government ) for every mishap that occur. A house collapsed, no one rejoices, but let"s stop placing blame when we don"t know the facts. Let's take a closer look before we even blame the contractor. Do you believe, that if the home owner don't ask the authorities or even a private engineer to assist in determining the viability of the soil that they are going to build on ,this will happen automatically. Most people don't inform because they try to avoid meeting the standards. Many people get a plan approved for one building and go ahead and construct one different, then when all hell break loose, they want to blame everyone else. My fellow St.Lucians,let's be more responsible for our investments and try to maintain the highest standards,because it's our lives and our children's lives that depends on it. If you're not sure, get a qualified opinion.Thank you.

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    • I fully understand what you say, but the lowly person who attempts to build their home don't know about soil testing and movement and load bearing and the lot. I may approach an architect to design, but the builder implements, and this is where there is great failure - in the execution. I am not say ignorance is any excuse. I am merely saying that as the builder you should know when something is amiss, he should be the final line of defence.
      And I do agree that all have to play a part. The person who gets his house certified for one thing but does another should bear responsibility... but even before, when the government approves one plan but does not do checks to ensure you go to plan then this is what happens. People are opportunistic by nature...remember when the cat is away the mice will play

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  3. Inapt DCA and too lazy to move their assess to inspect
    Regularly the building progress. fot the rest most builders are crooks and are fooling their clients. this island is really going down the drain.

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  4. There are other aspects ee need to investigate.
    Who designed the bulding. Wad it properly designed?
    Did planning approve the plan?
    If so, was it built to specification?
    Was the foundation slab etc supervised by any other authorised party?
    Was the sand and mixture in accordance with acceptable standards ( hope it was not the river sand from culdesac hess beach. Contractors routinely trick home owners and use this inferior sand for building purposes.
    Was there any signs of damage to any neighbouring properties which may be attributed to soil slippage..or were there any other dangerous faults in the earth known or observable prior to building.
    In closing I wish to strongly advise home owner to drag contractot builder draftsman architect, planning dept and others who failed to inspect , depending on culpable parties after a thorouhg investigation.
    Future home owner woulf be well advised to always have a suitable professional draw up a proper contract. You can seek the services of an accountant,lawyer,real estate agent, engineer,management consultant. I an hesitant to recomment an architect as very often they are in cohoots with the contractor recommended by they
    Remember this legal maxim Caveat Emptor...let d buyer beware.

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  5. what a shame. When will we stop seeing and hearing of these unfortunate circumstances. I think we as Lucians need to demand from government that there is a course of redress for victims, and by that I mean swift redress where it is effect in the shortest time frame. I had experience where a contractor ran up the cost of an unsuspecting lady trying to build her home to near million dollars. when he needs a few lengths of steel makes her buy a ton, and the rest going to his other projects. Further, the job he requested the steel for does not have nearly the amount it is supposed to.

    By the way, the collapsed house does not seem to have much steel from what I can see.

    thank God no own got hurt. Hope this family has means to redress

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  6. We can argue the same for government contracts handed down to new or non contractors, but one thing is for sure. All government jobs are being supervised by an engineer and technicians thus ensuring a solid structure. Besides an uprising contractor works for the name do their utmost to deliver a good product as apposed to the old ones who knows the short cuts to maximized profit. The structure looks poor but land movement may have contributed a swell. My heart goes out to the family

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  7. praise the lord dey had move out or else if dey were der @ da time, it wud hve been very drastic..... Nw its time to deal wit da contractor n the house is only 2years old? This is so nt nice.

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  8. It is high time the relevant authorities make and enforce laws to ensure that builders are properly qualified by certification and experience. All building contractors should be licenced as is required in the civilised world.
    The home owner should do potential home owners a favour by publishing the name of contractor / builder

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  9. Although it is hard to tell from the picture, it appears that the walls lack reinforcement. That the roof stayed virtually intact despite the walls collapse appears to indicate that the roof was not secured well enough to the wall - if it were, it would likely have deformed more / been pulled more apart by the walls collapsing. The house definitely appears to have been poorly constructed. That being said, often in St. Lucia, a draftsman does some drawings for planning with basic general structural details. These do not necessarily correspond with the actual ground conditions, terrain or the resulting height that the buildings may go up if on columns. Draftsmen in large part are unqualified to ascertain ground conditions or to evaluate potential hazards due to local drainage issues. This is where an engineer comes in. It is worth the extra few hundred dollars to have this checked - your house is likely your biggest investment, and your sanctuary. As an Architect, I always work with an engineer to ensure the structural integrity of my clients projects. We also inspect construction works throughout the build process to ensure the builder builds according to what is on the drawing. The authorities are also to inspect construction, but rarely if ever venture on site, and as such many buildings in St. Lucia get away with contravening both construction and planning guidelines. Hopefully this tragedy will serve as both a warning and an example, and guidelines and rules will be enforced, and the proposed certification of building trades will be pushed through faster, otherwise we may hear of more cases.

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  10. By the looks of it, this was a poorly built structure, no reinforcement, wow in todays world contractors can still get away with that.

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  11. Thank God the family is safe. My concern now is whether the building was insured for the full value; most times the buildings are only insured for the amount borrowed from the bank, a case like this one with a total loss, if it was only insured for the borrowed amount the bank will get it's monies back less the excess and the family have to start from scratch plus the difference left to pay back to the bank. This is so sad. Please property owners insure you building for it's full value so in a case like this one, the insurance will pay the bank and you will have monies left to start your house over. I borrowed EC$200,000.00 to renovate my house the full value is EC$450,000.00, I did my insurance for the full value.

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  12. Thank God no one got hurt, they must have had a guardian angel watching over them. Whoever build this house hope they might have a counsience to either refund the family their money back or rebuild the house. I'm not sure I would trust their building in future whoever they are.

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  13. In addition to poor construction, it looks like the ground may have shifted a bit to cause this type of collapse.

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    • true.. very true.. but shouldn't that be taken into account when building? Is the subsoil stable enough? Slope...weight of house? and ummm reinforcement prior to building the foundation?

      I assume most contractors don't have the equipment to test... someone has land and they just build. Sad but true.

      hope they figure it out and the family is able to recover.

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  14. A Contractor built this house, shame to say he didn't do a good job. I know him but wont mention his name. A crack appeared in the house, and the occupants were advised to move out. Thankfully they listened and were spared. Such a beautiful house gone! Thank God their lives were spared....

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