28 St. Lucians deported from the US in 2012

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28 St. Lucians deported from the US in 2012

Twenty-eight St. Lucians were sent packing from the United States in 2012,  according to figures from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE).

According to a report 14 were sent to St. Lucia because of criminal convictions and 14 as well for what ICE described as ‘non-criminal’.

The St. Lucian deportees with criminal convictions were among 4,898 criminal immigrants who were sent back to the Caribbean last year.

A “criminal alien” is defined under U.S. immigration laws as a migrant who is convicted of a crime.

Most of those deported were sent back for murders and sex and drug crimes, according to ICE.

Non-criminal immigrants deported to the Caribbean totaled 1,612.

In total, the number of all immigrants sent back to the Caribbean region in 2012 was put at 6,510 by ICE. For the Caribbean in 2012, the highest number of criminal deportees, 2264, were sent back to the Dominican Republic  and Jamaica was second with 1,213.

ICE deported 41 to Dominica: 19 with criminal convictions and 22 as ‘non-criminal.’

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director, John Morton, said the US administration’s focus remains on removing from the country, convicted criminals and other individuals who fall into priority areas for enforcement.

“Smart and effective immigration enforcement relies on setting priorities for removal and executing on those priorities,” he said. “In order to further enhance our ability to focus enforcement efforts on serious offenders, we are changing who ICE will issue detainers against.”

He said the 2012 report indicates that progess is being made in removing criminal elements from the US. “We are constantly looking for ways to ensure that we are doing everything we can to utilize our resources in a way that maximizes public safety,” Morton stated.

The rates for other countries were as follows:

Haiti: 758 total removals (568 criminal and 190 non-criminal);
Trinidad and Tobago: 242 total removals (187 criminal and 55 non-criminal);
Belize: 217 total removals (152 criminal and 65 non-criminal);
Guyana: 182 total removals (154 criminal and 28 non-criminal);
The Bahamas: 123 total removals (98 criminal and 25 non-criminal);
Cuba: 66 total removals (55 criminal and 11 non-criminal);
Barbados: 50 total removals (45 criminal and 5 non-criminal);
Dominica: 41 total removals (19 criminal and 22 non-criminal);
St. Kitts-Nevis: 40 total removals (32 criminal and 8 non-criminal);
Antigua & Barbuda: 36 total removals (25 criminal and 11 non-criminal)
Grenada: 25 total removals (15 criminal and 10 non-criminal);
Turks Caicos Islands: 10 total removals (7 criminal and 3 non-criminal).
British Virgin Islands: 9 total removals (7 criminal and 2 non-criminal);
Bermuda: 8 total removals (5 criminal and 3 non-criminal);
Suriname: 6 total removals (6 criminal and 0 non-criminal);
Guadeloupe: 2 total removals (1 criminal and 1 non-criminal);
Montserrat: 2 total removals (2 criminal and 0 non-criminal);
Netherlands Antilles, inclusive of St. Maarten, Curacao, Saba, Bonaire: 2 total removals (1 criminal and 1 non-criminal);
Anguilla: 1 total removal (0 criminal and 1 non-criminal);
Cayman Islands: 1 total removals (1 criminal and 0 non-criminal);
Aruba: 0 total removal;

For Latin America, Mexico topped the list with 289,686 total removals including174,003 criminal and 115,683 non-criminals while Guatemala was second with 40,498 total removals (14,251 criminal and 26,247 non-criminal).

Other country rates were as follows:
Honduras: 32,464 total removals (14,180 criminal and 18,284 non-criminal);
El Salvador: 19,694 total removals (9,095 criminal and 10,599 non-criminal);
Brazil: 2,804 total removals (509 criminal and 2,295 non-criminal);
Ecuador: 1,976 total removals (819 criminal and 1,157 non-criminal);
Colombia: 1,681 total removals (1,121 criminal and 560 non-criminal);
Nicaragua: 1,507 total removals (777 criminal and 730 non-criminal);
Costa Rica: 380 total removals (152 criminal and 228 non-criminal);
Venezuela: 284 total removals (131 criminal and 153 non-criminal);
Argentina: 226 total removals (119 criminal and 107 non-criminal);
Bolivia: 197 total removals (131 criminal and 66 non-criminal);
Panama: 137 total removals (100 criminal and 37 non-criminal);
Uruguay: 119 total removals (63 criminal and 56 non-criminal)
Chile: 115 total removals (74 criminal and 41 non-criminal);
Peru: 908 total removals (504 criminal and 404 non-criminal);
Paraguay: 18 total removals (10 criminal and 8 non-criminal).
The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said they deported 409,849 immigrants who broke criminal laws, were threats to national security and were recent border crossers and repeat violators of immigration law, around the globe in 2012.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. Caribbean Leaders.. WAKE UP.. How do you intend to deal with these criminals.

    They need to go straight back into a special jail for CRIMINAL DEPORTIES..

    WAKE UP AND LET US ACT, BUILD A SPECIAL JAIL FOR THESE DYFUNCTIONAL PEOPLE AND DO NOT GIVEN THEM THE SLIGHTEST CHANCE OF DESTROYING A COUNTRY THEY HAVE NO CONTRIBUTED IN BUILDING.

    LET US ACT NOW.. IT WILL COST US NOW BUT IN THE LONG RUN WILL PAY OFF!

    LET US UNIT AND DEAL WITH THESE DEPORTED CRIMINALS.

    WHAT ARE THEY PAYING THESE ADVISORS FOR.....

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  2. The RSLF should put an ankle bracelet on them, the moment they land and monitor them 24/7. Most of them are sophisticated criminals, they are very good at what they do and always a step ahead of the coppers.

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  3. Good riddance.....They will learn to respect other people's countries and the laws of their lands. Now go scratch and sniff back home day ban sal twis. Message for you all, don't even think of terrorizing people back home, because you all will look like pieces of swiss cheese in the morgue they will not tolerate you all bullshit that's for sure.

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